Monthly Archives: December 2012

Merry Christmas from all of us at PCRS Computers


PCRS Computers would like to wish everyone Merry Christmas. Have a great day with your family and friends enjoy the holiday’s. PCRS computers are going to take a break but we will be back bright and early on the 26 to help you set up all of you tech toys.

PCRS Computers PC Troubleshooting Tips


PCRS Computers PC Troubleshooting Tips

Why is My PC Crashing?

PC computer troubleshooting tips

Nothing can put a damper on productivity quite like a computer that crashes on a regular basis. Sometimes, a crash is preceded by the dreaded “blue screen of death” or another warning; other times, a computer simply shuts off without any warning at all. In either case, the end result is a whole lot of frustration, aggravation and lost work. If your computer has been crashing frequently, you’d probably like to put an end to it. Unfortunately, getting to the bottom of things if often easier said than done. The following tips about improving your computer’s performance, though, are excellent places to begin.

Possibility #1: Corrupted System Registry Files

Every Windows-based PC has something called a Windows registry. The registry contains several files that are integral to the performance and operation of your computer. Over time, some of those files can become corrupted, be misplaced or get lost altogether. When that happens, the system registry becomes compromised – and frequent crashes are all-too-common symptoms. The best way to rule this possibility in or out is by running a Windows registry cleaning program. Such programs scan your Windows registry for problems then automatically make repairs. If you run a registry cleaner and the crashes persist, they are probably being caused by a different issue.

Possibility #2: Disorganized Files

Windows operating systems handle file organization in a way that isn’t very intuitive. Basically, they break files up and fit them into gaps in the computer’s memory. As time goes by, these disorganized files can prompt frequent crashes. Luckily, a great optimization solution is built right into Windows-based PCs: the disk defragmentation utility. Although its location on a computer varies, you can generally locate it within the System and Security section inside the Control Panel. By running a defrag once every few months, you may be able to keep those pesky computer crashes at bay.

Possibility #3: Malicious Software

Malicious software can take many different forms. Sometimes, it’s a virus that is accidentally unleashed after opening a strange email; other times, its adware that tags along with other information that is automatically downloaded from a website. Whatever type it is, there’s no question that malicious software can wreak havoc on a computer’s performance. Happily, there are many topnotch programs out there that regularly scan your computer for the presence of such problems – and that help guard against them, too. Buy one, install it and use it regularly; your crash issues may come to an end.

Possibility #4: Too Little Available Memory

When you buy a new computer, it feels like there’s no end to the amount of memory that it has. Of course, this isn’t true at all. As never-ending as the available memory on your PC may initially seem, the fact is that it can be depleted with incredible speed. You can find out for sure by checking the information within “My Computer.” If it appears that your available memory is low, you can use a PC cleanup program to remove unnecessary files; such programs remove things like temporary Internet files and other file debris that can suck away much-needed memory.

Possibility #5: Overheating

If you’ve run through all of the preceding possibilities and continue experiencing frequent crashes, a hardware issue could be to blame. An easy one to rule out is overheating. A computer’s CPU, or central processing unit, includes a fan that is designed to keep it running cool. Sometimes, the fan wears down and doesn’t work as efficiently; other times, it’s just not able to handle the work that your computer has to do. In either case, buying a bigger, better fan isn’t very expensive. If it puts an end to your PC crashing problem, it will have been more than worth it.

Don’t Put Up with Frequent Crashes!

As discussed, frequent computer crashes can be triggered by a wide variety of issues. Luckily, many of these issues are relatively easy to remedy. Work your way through the preceding list; chances are, you’ll be able to pinpoint the problem and put an effective cure to work. Nine times out of ten, a computer simply needs a little bit of routine maintenance to get it back on track again. In the future, keep these points in mind. Any time you buy a new computer, keep up with its basic maintenance right from the get-go. By doing that, you could avoid “blue screen of death” and crashing problems altogether – and that’s something that you’re bound to appreciate!

PCRS Computers Computer Tips & Tricks


PCRS Computers Computer Tips & Tricks

How to Improve Your Computer’s Performance

computer tips

Tips for Speeding Up Your PC

Few things are as frustrating as dealing with a slow, sluggish computer. When a computer is brand new, it works wonderfully well. Over time, though, its performance can slowly begin to worsen. This happens for a number of reasons, but the biggest culprits are things like spyware, adware and other computer threats that are unwittingly downloaded along with other content while online. You don’t have to download thousands of MP3s, movies or other items to experience these problems, either – nobody is immune to them. Instead of accepting the situation, there are plenty of techniques and strategies that you can use to make it better – a few of the best ones are outlined below.

Strategy #1: Clean Your Computer’s Windows Registry

The biggest cause of slow, sluggish PC performance is errors and problems within its Windows registry. Adware, spyware and other threats usually target the registry, damaging or misplacing important files within it. When it comes to PC cleaning, a daily Windows registry cleaning should be at the top of your list of priorities. However, this should never be done manually – there are too many opportunities for major errors that could seriously damage your PC’s operating system. Instead, invest in a high-quality Windows registry cleanup program and configure it to run once per day – you won’t believe the difference that it makes.

Strategy #2: Remove Unneeded Files

Every time you log on to the Internet or otherwise use your computer, temporary files are generated. They are usually only needed once; however, they don’t disappear on their own. Instead, they accumulate over time until they are cluttering up your computer’s file system and affecting its performance. While it’s possible to remove these files one-by-one, it’s much easier and quicker to use a PC cleaning tool that’s designed for the purpose. Try to do so about one time per week to keep your computer humming along with ease.

Strategy #3: Remove Unneeded Programs

Like many people, you probably download and try out many different programs each month. How many of them do you actually end up using on a regular basis? Chances are, not very many of them. By getting into the habit of uninstalling unused and unneeded programs, you can keep your computer’s file system a lot less cluttered. In turn, your PC’s performance will improve dramatically. You can optimize your computer in this way by using its Add/Remove Programs feature. Its location varies by operating system, but you should be able to find it somewhere in the Control Panel.

Strategy #4: Empty the Recycle Bin

When you click “delete” on a file or a program, it doesn’t go away for good – not immediately, anyway. Instead, it sits in a kind of purgatory in your computer’s Recycle Bin. As things pile up in the Recycle Bin, your computer can start exhibiting some very annoying problems. If sluggish startups and frequent crashes are occurring with increasing frequency – and your computer’s recycle bin is very full – go ahead and empty it. From then on, get into the habit of doing so about one time per week. This small but important strategy can make a huge difference.

Strategy #5: Perform a Disk Defragmentation

Windows isn’t very efficient when it comes to storing files. It actually splits them up, depositing them into whatever spaces are available. The more spaced apart the pieces of a file are, the harder your computer has to work to make them run. The Windows disk defragmentation system tune-up utility works to piece all of those files back together again. The process is a long one, though, and only needs to be done about four times per year. Set it up to run automatically once every three months. By doing so, you’ll be able to keep your computer running in tiptop shape.

When it comes to keeping your computer running optimally, small but regular maintenance is the best way to go. Protecting your PC only does so much; even the most careful Internet users in the world unintentionally download malicious software from time to time. By using basic system tune-up tools, cleaning your computer’s Windows registry regularly, performing regular file-cleaning maintenance and otherwise optimizing your PC, you should be able to keep it in like-new condition for a lot longer. Even if your computer has been performing slowly for some time, beginning this regimen is sure to produce results. In the end, you’ll be able to enjoy a computer that flies along – instead of one that spins its wheels.

PCRS Computers Networking Tips


PCRS Computers Networking Tips

How to Set Up and Troubleshoot a Home Computer Network

Computer Networking Tips

Setting up a home computer network may sound daunting, but it’s relatively simple, provided you break everything down into specific steps. Home computer networks are ideal for sharing a wireless connection among multiple computers, especially for those who have a home office, teenagers, or another computer configuration.

Purchasing a Router

Before you begin to worry about software, worry about hardware. A excellent router, like a Cisco router or a Linksys router, will save you from having to endlessly reboot and reprogram while still allowing you to quickly set up a home network. Make sure you buy from a company that has years of experience designing high quality routers that are capable of handling high amounts of traffic (such as data heavy media files). Virtually any home network will run smoothly without irritating slowness or delays.

Wireless Bandwidth

After you’ve purchased a router, the next step is to determine how much bandwidth you are receiving from your wireless connection. This becomes particularly important if you have a household where the network users are habitually downloading movies or other large data files. While a router can rapidly transfer this information, it is constrained by the amount of bandwidth available to the household. A connection that transmits data at 2.4 GHz with a 54 megabit speed is usually adequate to the task.

If your network feels exceptionally sluggish, check to make sure that you are receiving the wireless by ‘pinging’ the network. Alternatively, if you are receiving the full wireless bandwidth but are still experiencing slow results because of the types of media you are transferring, you may consider paying for a faster service.

Software Drivers

While software drivers for networking are fairly easy to find and download from the Internet, purchasing software directly from a computer retailer is recommended as a way to keep your network free of faulty software. A higher incidence of spyware and viruses makes downloading free software inadvisable, especially for something as sensitive as a computer network.

Purchasing software from one of the major companies, such as McAfee or Symantec, will also provide you with another vital component of wireless home networking: a firewall. Because wireless networks are difficult to secure, the best option is to buy software that not only allows you to network, but is built specifically to keep out uninvited users. Firewalls are designed to protect your valuable information behind a tightly secured ‘wall’ which can’t be accessed unless a very specific encrypted code is used.

Basic Set-Up

Now that you have all the components, you’ll want to set up the router first. Install the software driver onto each computer that will use the network. Set up a passkey that is fairly hard to break. Avoid simple or obvious terms that an outside user could easily guess. Set up each computer with this information.

The company that is providing your wireless connection will usually assign you a name and a passkey. However, in some configurations, you will be able to reprogram this information.

Troubleshooting

No matter how expertly a system is set up, on occasion a technical problem manifests, resulting in a lack of connectivity for computers. There are a few ways to quickly check what’s working and what’s not.

Usually, problems are caused by one of two things: the software on the computer itself is malfunctioning, and not allowing the computer to connect. You can test this by seeing if any other computers can connect to the network. If they can, the problem is local to that computer. A simple reboot of the software should solve this problem. However, if the software continues to be unable to connect to the internet, you will need to uninstall the software, and then reinstall it. Sometimes, a version can become corrupted. By wiping it clean and starting anew, the problem should resolve itself.

The second most common problem is that the router needs a quick reboot. If you purchase a quality router, you will not have this problem very often, although every now and again even the best routers need a quick reboot. Turn the router off for at least thirty seconds. Switch it back on, and check your connectivity in about ten minutes. This gives the system plenty of time to reset itself.

If this doesn’t work, the wireless provider may temporarily be out. Call your wireless provider to determine if they are experiencing an outage, and when you can expect the resumption of service. If all of these methods don’t resolve your problem, there is a basic flaw in your initial setup.

PCRS Computers Security Tips


PCRS Computers Security Tips

computer security virus tips

How to Protect Your Computer From Viruses

With millions of computer users browsing the web at any given time, there are plenty of targets for malicious coders. While computer experts don’t always know why coders choose to build harmful computer programs, the fact is that it happens all the time. Computer viruses can steal personal information, interfere with normal operations, attract spam and even shut down your computer’s hard drive. Protecting your computer is critical for browsing success.

Start With the Basics

Most computer systems come with security features already in place. For example, the Windows operating system is packaged with Microsoft Windows Security Center. When you first open, boot up and register a new computer, you should make sure that this program is functioning. It will give basic protection against spyware, viruses and malware. In addition, a basic firewall is built into this program, providing additional protection and stops for potentially harmful programs. Upon activation, don’t be surprised if your security system needs immediate updating. Software that protects your computer needs regular and consistent updating to stay useful. Viruses are constantly being generated and the several-month lag between when your computer was made and when you first started using it can mean that the database the security system is loaded with is severely out-of-date.

Upgrade to Meet Your Needs

Many people operate computers for a long time with only basic protection in place. However, heavy computer users or those who have risky browsing habits can sometimes benefit from upgrading their virus, spyware and malware protection, as well as using a fuller-featured firewall; this is especially important if you use a networked computer system. Basic or free virus protection will still scan and update for viruses. Paid programs, however, offer more features, including ease-of-use and convenience features. The most important thing is to verify the publisher and make sure you are getting what is promised. Most well-known virus protection programs, such as AVG and Norton Security, have reviews available to help you make your choice.

Learn About Spyware Risks

Spyware creates risks that many computer users are not aware of. If you are only protecting against viruses, you could be leaving your computer open to damage. Most people are familiar with spyware that initiates and attracts annoying ad programs. Spyware, however, can be much more malicious as well. Your shopping habits can be tracked by spyware. While not exactly harmful, some people consider this a breach of privacy. The worst spyware programs interfere with normal operations and can even track what you type, sending personal information to people who want to steal your identity. Some spyware redirects your browser to different web addresses, increasing your risks of virus infection and fraud.

How Viruses Work

The main difference between spyware and viruses is how they are spread. A virus reproduces itself and attaches to any document that the computer sends, while spyware can be stored as a cookie or tracking code. A virus is most often found traveling with a piece of computer software, such as a document, picture or piece of music. When dealing with email, it is necessary to open an attachment to become infected, indicating that, in most cases, the computer user must somehow invite the malicious software to replicate on their system. Of course, most people have no idea it is there or what is happening. Some of the sneakiest and most harmful viruses actually masquerade as virus protection software, making them extremely hard to detect. Because of this, it’s crucial to be familiar with your particular virus protection program and know what it looks like and what the normal scripts and prompts are during operation. Viruses do some of the same things that spyware does; they just accomplish it differently. An active virus can steal personal information, generate ads or shut down your system, including the very virus protection programs that can fix the issue.

Take Steps For Protection

Like anything, the best way to protect against viruses is to be educated. Become familiar with what malicious software may look like. If you get an email or are asked to download a file that you don’t recognize or looks suspicious, do your homework. Research virus protection, spyware, malware and firewall programs and use them to their fullest capacity. Set the software to update and scan automatically to make sure that the system is constantly monitored. In addition, regularly check on the databases published by various virus protection services; many will provide lists of symptoms and risks, as well as the standard way the file gains access for no cost to the public.

PCRS Computers Computer Buying Tips


PCRS Computers Computer Buying Tips

 

Buying a Mac or PC Computer

Should You Buy a Mac or a PC?

Deciding whether to buy a Mac or a PC should be based on two main points: your budget and whether the computer is primarily for business or pleasure. Both types of computers are excellent for specific tasks, although if you are planning to go to work and bring your computer with you, you may need to consider what types of computers your coworkers will have to make it easier to swap files or compare notes. Here a few basic tips on how to choose the right computer for you.

Budget

There’s no debate—Macs are far more expensive than PCs. If money is a big issue for you, you’ll want to buy a PC. However, Macs aren’t overpriced. Unlike PCs, each computer is designed for maximum efficiency in both processing speed and ease of use. While PCs frequently crash and are vulnerable to spyware and viruses, Macs resist most viral attacks and operate at a consistently high standard with virtually no technical issues. If you can afford it, a Mac is an excellent investment which will work for you for years.

Business

While Macs have always been the preferred computer of graphic designers and other creative individuals, for most corporate office work, PCs have long been favored over Macs. For this reason, PCs still dominate in most business settings.

Up until a few years ago, the major software designed for business suites, like the Microsoft Suite, was designed chiefly for PCs. However, the popularity of other Apple products such as the iPod and iPad has started to change the way Macs are perceived in the larger corporate world. Most business software now has versions available for both Macs and PCs. Because of their heftier price tag, Macs still have a long way to go in making a dent in the corporate world, although in terms of functionality they perform just as well as a PC.

Graphically, Macs have richer displays and a Linux based operating system that makes them ideal for manipulating complex information such as layered graphical displays. Photoshop was initially designed for the Mac. If you are buying a computer for use in a professionally creative setting, your coworkers will likely also be using Macs.

Programming

Computer programmers are evenly split on whether Macs or PCs make better programming tools. The truth is, it comes down to a matter of personal preference. Macs developed a comprehensive suite of developer tools with their OS 10 which, if used properly, can help you get to the moon. PCs have always been oriented toward programming; in fact, the DOS/Windows interface was developed mainly as a way to stay competitive with the user friendly Mac interface. However, many programmers have complained that Macs are slower than PCs when it comes down to executing large amounts of freshly programmed code.

Personal Use

If you enjoy playing video games in your spare time, buying a PC is probably the best choice. This is partly because PCs are easier to hook up to auxiliary equipment like television sets or other devices. Although USB ports are evenly distributed between Macs and PC, the higher data transfer portals of a Mac do not always adapt easily to most conventional televisions, making it difficult to quickly relay information between the two devices, whereas the higher data transfer portals of a PC are usually very adaptable to auxiliary devices.

If, on the other hand, you prefer to design or develop creative projects in your personal time, Macs are a much better choice. Because Apple has invested so much time in making the user interface incredibly easy to use, spending time creating music or drawing or editing movies becomes less about the computer and more about the activity; you forget you are using a computer, and can instead focus on the act of creation. PCs have a more rigid approach; it’s hard to forget that you’re on a computer.

Cloud Computing and the Future of Virtualization

Of course, with the tech community excited about the potential of cloud computing, computer memory is going to become less of an issue, with flexibility, mobility, and processing speed becoming increasingly important when making purchasing decisions. Mac’s suite of mobile devices are far better adapted to shifting between different geographical areas while also offering enough functionality to make them viable business tools. However, for now you should buy the computer that best suits your needs, and plan on the inevitable: no matter what you buy now, in a few years it will be completely outdated anyway!

Computer of the week 12-17-2012


Quote

PCRS Computers

420 Winchester Rd

Geneva, IN 46740

260-220-9527

Email: a.patch@pcrscomputers.com

Website: www.pcrscomputers.com

   
 
Salesperson Quote sHIPPING mETHOD sHIPPING tERMS dELIVERY dATE pAYMENT tERMS dUE dATE
Andrew Patch #116 N/A N/A N/A Due on Receipt  
 
Quantity Description Price
1 HP Compaq 6530b Notebook PC – Intel Core 2 Duo P8700 2.53GHz, 2GB DDR2, 160GB HDD, DVDRW, 14.1″ Display, Windows 7 Professional (Off-Lease)

  $323.99

1 Setup $25.00
1 Shipping $10.00
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 

We Treat You Right For Less.

 

Thank you for your business.

Subtotal $358.99
  Sales Tax $22.68
  Total $381.67
 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call 260-2209527 for more info and to order one for Christmas

PCRS Computers Review Corner 12-11-2012


Today we are going to review

Seagate Momentus XT Solid State Hybrid Drive

Momentus XT Solid State Hybrid Drive

Momentus XT Solid State Hybrid Drive

The Momentus XT SSHD fuses the blazing speed of solid state with the high capacity of a disk drive to unleash your system performance by removing the data bottleneck. The FAST Factor™ advantage takes the Momentus XT drive to a new level by enhancing data integrity and increasing storage longevity.
SSD Speed. HDD Capacity. A Price That Makes Sense.

Boots and performs like an SSD1

Faster than a traditional HDD1

SATA 6Gb/s with NCQ for interface speed

All-in-one design for simplicity and ease of installation

Works in any laptop or PC, any OS and any application

Backed by a 3-year limited warranty
Best-Fit Applications

Laptops and mobile workstations

Desktop and tower workstations

High-performance laptop and desktop gaming systems

Small form factor all-in-one PCs
1 Performance may vary depending on user’s hardware configuration and operating system.
Testing performed on a Momentus XT 750GB SSHD.
Data Sheet
Momentus® XT SSHD
Specifications
750GB1
500GB1
Model Number
ST750LX003
ST95005620AS
NAND Type/Size
SLC/8GB
SLC/4GB
Interface
SATA 6Gb/s NCQ
SATA 3Gb/s NCQ
Special Performance Features
Flash Management
Yes

Fast Boot Technology
Yes

Adaptive Memory™ Technology
Yes
Yes
Performance
Spindle Speed (RPM)
7200
7200
Cache, Multisegmented (MB)
32
32
SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)
6.0/3.0/1.5
3.0/1.5
Seek Average, Read (ms)
11.0
11.0
Seek Average, Write (ms)
13.0
13.0
Configuration/Organization
Heads/Disks
4/2
4/2
Bytes per Sector
4096
512
Reliability/Data Integrity
Head-Rest Method
QuietStep™ Ramp Load
QuietStep Ramp Load
Load/Unload Cycles
600,000
600,000
Nonrecoverable Read Errors per Bits Read, Max
1 per 10E14
1 per 10E14
Power Management
Power (W)
Seek, Typical
1.3
1.1
Idle, Typical
1.1
0.8
Environmental
Temperature (°C)
Operating
0 to 60
0 to 60
Nonoperating
−40 to 70
−40 to 70
Shock (Gs)
Operating: 2ms
350
350
Nonoperating: 1ms
1000
1000
Acoustics (bels—sound power)
Idle, Typical
2.3
2.3
Seek, Typical
2.6
2.6
Physical
Height (in/mm)
0.370/9.5
0.370/9.5
Width (in/mm)
2.75/69.85
2.75/69.85
Depth (in/mm)
3.951/100.35
3.951/100.35
Weight (lb/g)
0.253/115
0.238/110
Carton Unit Quantity
50
50
Cartons per Pallet
60
60
Cartons per Layer
10
10
http://www.seagate.com
AMERICAS Seagate Technology LLC 10200 South De Anza Boulevard, Cupertino, California 95014, United States, 408-658-1000
ASIA/PACIFIC Seagate Singapore International Headquarters Pte. Ltd. 7000 Ang Mo Kio Avenue 5, Singapore 569877, 65-6485-3888
EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA Seagate Technology SAS 16–18, rue du Dôme, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France, 33 1-4186 10 00
© 2012 Seagate Technology LLC. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Seagate, Seagate Technology and the Wave logo are registered trademarks of Seagate Technology LLC in the United States and/or other countries. Adaptive Memory, Momentus and QuietStep are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Seagate Technology LLC or one of its affiliated companies in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. When referring to drive capacity, one gigabyte, or GB, equals one billion bytes and one terabyte, or TB, equals one trillion bytes. Your computer’s operating system may use a different standard of measurement and report a lower capacity. In addition, some of the listed capacity is used for formatting and other functions, and thus will not be available for data storage. Seagate reserves the right to change, without notice, product offerings or specifications. DS1704.5-1209US, September 2012
1 One gigabyte, or GB, equals one billion bytes and one terabyte, or TB, equals one trillion bytes when referring to drive capacity.
Momentus® XT SSHD
As a techie i love this drive there are affordable and very reliable. I would recomend them to all of my followers. i have included in this blog the info i got off of seagates website about this drive and if you would like to order one please call 260-220-9527 or contact us throught our website by clicking here.
As this is a new part of PCRS Computers Blog i would like it if you would comment below and share it with everyone you can. your comments are the only way i know if i am doing the articles you want to read so please share and comment to let me know how i am doing.

Computer of the Week 12/10/2012


Quote

PCRS Computers420 Winchester RdGeneva, IN 46740260-220-9527

Email: a.patch@pcrscomputers.com

Website: www.pcrscomputers.com

Salesperson Quote SHIPPING METHOD SHIPPING TERMS DELIVERY DATE PAYMENT TERMS DUE DATE
Andrew Patch #201 N/A N/A N/A Due on Receipt
Quantity Description Price
1 HP DC7700 Desktop PC – Intel Pentium D 925 3.0GHz, 4GB DDR2, 1TB HDD, DVDRW, Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit (Off Lease)

$281.99

1 Setup $25.00
1 Shipping $12.00

We Treat You Right For Less.

Thank you for your business.

Subtotal $318.99
Sales Tax $19.74
Total $338.31

Computer of the week


Quote

PCRS Computers420 Winchester Rd

Geneva, IN 46740

260-220-9527

Email: a.patch@pcrscomputers.com

Website: www.pcrscomputers.com

Salesperson Quote sHIPPING mETHOD sHIPPING tERMS dELIVERY dATE pAYMENT tERMS dUE dATE
Andrew Patch #112 N/A N/A N/A Due on Receipt
Quantity Description Price
1 Dell Latitude E6400 Notebook PC – Intel Core 2 Duo 2.2GHz, 4GB DDR2, 160GB HDD, DVDRW, 14.1″ Display, Webcam, Windows 7 Professional (Off-Lease) $359.99
1 Setup $25.00
1 Shipping $10.00

We Treat You Right For Less.

Thank you for your business.

Subtotal $394.99
Sales Tax $25.20
Total $420.19
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